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Which factors might affect your custody case?

| Apr 17, 2021 | Child Custody

You might have a high income and a house in a good neighborhood in Michigan, but that doesn’t automatically mean you’ll get full custody. The judge might consider other factors like you and your estranged spouse’s relationship with your child. One parent might get full custody or more parenting time if they seem to be more involved than the other.

What might the judge consider during a custody case?

During your child custody case, the court might interview you and your estranged spouse to evaluate your relationships with the child. The evaluator might look at the ways that you interact with your child and which parent takes more responsibility. The judge might rule in favor of one parent if they seem to be much more involved in their child’s life.

However, being more involved doesn’t automatically decide the case. The evaluator might ask questions to figure out which parent is genuine and which parent is just trying to get back at their spouse. They might also look at the child’s interactions with their parents to see if they have a closer relationship with one parent over the other. Since children aren’t the most objective thinkers, the evaluator will probably consider additional factors.

The evaluator might also consider the age and health of the parents. If one parent has physical or mental health issues, they might have trouble raising a child on their own. Additionally, the evaluator might ask questions about your parenting style and how you raise and discipline your child. A judge might be reluctant to give a parent custody if they seem to be a cold, distant figure in their child’s life. This is a lot to consider, but your divorce attorney could help you prepare for your custody case.

Should you focus on yourself or your spouse?

While it might be tempting to point out your estranged spouse’s parenting flaws, you should focus on yourself unless your estranged spouse poses a threat to the child. Your attorney could offer advice on showing the judge that you’re a committed parent who’s willing to act in your child’s best interests.