Are you aware of the potential consequences of driving under the influence in Michigan? The state distinguishes between operating while visibly impaired and operating while intoxicated.

These are the facts motorists should know about the various state penalties for an OWI or OWVI conviction.

First-time conviction

If you receive an OWI with no prior record, you could receive fines between $100 and $500 and up to 93 days in jail, a 30-day driver’s license suspension and subsequent 150-day license restriction. With an OWI, your blood alcohol content is above 0.08%. If your BAC is higher than 0.17%, penalties increase to up to 180 days in jail, fines of $200 to $700 and one-year driver’s license suspension. Both charges carry up to 360 hours of community service and six points on your driving record.

The law mandates less severe penalties for an OWVI, in which an officer observes your impairment while driving. You may receive a driver’s license restriction for 90 days, four driver’s license points and a fine of up to $300. Possible jail time and community service are the same as with an OWI.

Second conviction in seven years

If you already have an OWI or OWVI and receive another OWI conviction, you could receive between $200 and $1,000 in fines, 30 to 90 days of community service, five days to one year in jail, confiscation of your vehicle’s license plate, immobilization or forfeiture of your vehicle and six driver’s license points. An OWVI carries fewer points, but penalties are otherwise the same.

Michigan charges any subsequent offense in the same seven-year period as a felony. Other felony OWI convictions include an arrest on a suspended or revoked license or an accident involving death or serious injury. In addition, the state maintains a zero-tolerance policy for drivers younger than 21. Any level of alcohol in the blood results in an OWI.