When the state decides to charge you with a crime, they will often try to charge you with the most severe offense possible under the circumstances. One of the reasons that prosecutors bring serious charges against defendants is to push them into accepting plea deals to avoid conviction and the worst possible consequences.

If the prosecutor initially charged you with a felony and then offered a plea deal for a misdemeanor offense, it may seem like a great opportunity for you to avoid the worst case scenario. However, you should understand that you may have a lifelong struggle ahead of you because of that misdemeanor plea deal.

Misdemeanor convictions and original charges can show up in background checks

Whether you apply for admission into college or grad school, seek financial aid for college, want to move into a new apartment or apply for a better-paying job, there’s a good chance that a background check will be part of the process.

Misdemeanors will show up on your background check as readily as felonies, although some companies and individuals worry less about misdemeanor convictions then they do with felony offenses. Still, it’s important that you know that some companies view misdemeanor plea bargains after felony charges the same as they do for felony convictions The logic in this process is simple.

If you plead guilty to a misdemeanor offense while charged with a more serious felony, the company has every right to assume that you were guilty of the felony offense. In other words, you may have a hard time getting jobs, securing rental housing or even educating yourself.

Before you take a plea deal, you may want to look very carefully at all of your defense options, as avoiding a conviction entirely will be better for you in the long run then a misdemeanor on your record.